OBSTETRICS

OB1 Weekly Schedule

 

Labor & Delivery (OB1)

During this 6-week rotation, the OB1 works primarily on Labor & Delivery and Triage learning how to evaluate, manage, and treat women with low-risk pregnancies. The OB1 should gain an understanding of antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum care for this patient population. The OB1 is responsible for accepting the labor board during “Morning Board Turn” and signing out the board to the Night Float team at the end of the shift. Whenever possible, the OB1 should be directly involved with the care of patients in Triage and L&D. Their responsibilities include managing common Triage issues (rule-out labor, spontaneous rupture-of-membranes, vaginal bleeding, etc.), spontaneous vaginal deliveries, repair of perineal lacerations, and postpartum rounding. The Chief on service as well as the assigned Attending faculty will act as their most immediate supervisors during this rotation. The OB1 should participate in all educational conferences and didactic sessions offered while on service. During the second half of the year, the OB1 should participate in low-risk primary cesarean sections whenever possible.

 


 

High-Risk Obstetrics (HROB2) 

During this 6-week rotation, the OB2 resident works in the clinic seeing outpatient high-risk obstetric patients and in the inpatient setting gaining c-section experience. The resident should obtain an understanding of the management of antepartum patients and the medical comorbidities in this patient population. The OB2 will also work in tandem with the OB1 managing complex Triage patients and covering as the L&D Board Runner when the OB1 is in clinic. The Chief on service as well as the assigned Attending faculty will act as their most immediate supervisors during this rotation. The OB2 resident should participate in all educational conferences and didactics sessions offered while on service.


 

Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM3) 

During this 6-week rotation, the OB3 resident works primarily on Labor & Delivery and Triage learning how to evaluate, manage, and treat women with high-risk pregnancies. The OB3 should gain an understanding of antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum care for this patient population through being directly responsible for the MFM Service. The OB3 should be present during “Morning Board Turn” and when signing out the board to the Night Float team at the end of the shift. Whenever possible, the OB3 should be directly involved with the care of patients in Triage and L&D. The Chief on service as well as the assigned Attending faculty will act as their most immediate supervisors during this rotation. When the OB4 is in clinic, the OB3 will assume the roles and responsibilities of the Chief on service. The OB3 resident should participate in all educational conferences and didactic sessions offered while on service.


 

Labor & Delivery (OB4) 

During this 6-week rotation, the OB4 works primarily overseeing the rest of the L&D Day team on Labor & Delivery and Triage. They will also have some high-risk ambulatory responsibilities. The Chief should function as a junior attending, managing the low-risk and high-risk obstetric inpatients along with the rest of the team. This includes cesarean sections and operative deliveries (assisting/teaching other residents when possible). The assigned Attending faculty will act as their most immediate supervisor during this rotation. The OB4 should participate in all educational conferences and didactic sessions offered while on service.


 

Night Float Rotation

In the first, second, and fourth years of training, residents spend a total of 12 weeks on the Night Float rotation. The Night Float team works Sunday through Thursday nights and is collectively responsible for covering the Labor & Delivery suite, the ER, and the wards.

 


OB Photo